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Question

What is the densest thing on Earth?
Asked by: Georgia

Answer

Leaving aside the obvious political humor potential in your question, you did ask about the densest THING, not the densest material, on Earth. That would probably be a neutron. While many subatomic particles are considered points, and thus could be thought of as having an infinite density, the neutron has a measurable size (about 10-15 m in diameter) as well as mass (about 1.7 x 10-27 kg). Those numbers result in a density of about 1018 kg/m3.

That value matches the estimated density of neutron stars, the densest objects known in the Universe. (A black hole's mass is concentrated in an immeasurable singularity). A single neutron is a smaller (MUCH smaller!) version of a neutron star, and the Earth is loaded with neutrons.
Answered by: Paul Walorski, B.A. Physics, Part-time Physics Instructor
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'I beseech you to take interest in these sacred domains so expressively called laboratories. Ask that there be more and that they be adorned for these are the temples of the future, wealth and well-being. It is here that humanity will grow, strengthen and improve. Here, humanity will learn to read progress and individual harmony in the works of nature, while humanity's own works are all too often those of barbarism, fanaticism and destruction.'

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