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Be - Beryllium

Beryllium

 Beryllium 
Be
Atomic Number: 4
Atomic Weight: 9.01218
Element Type: Alkali Earth Metal
Crystal Structure: Hexagonal
Melting Point: 1287.0°C = 2348.6°F = 1560.15 K
Boiling Point: 2471.0°C = 4479.8°F = 2744.15 K
Critical Temp: °C = °F = K
Atomic Radius: 1.4 Å (Å = Angstrom = 10-10 m)
Covalent Radius: 0.9 Å
Electronegativity: 1.57

History

(Gr. beryllos, beryl; also called Glucinium or Glucinum, Gr. glykys, sweet) Discoveredas the oxide by Vauquelin in beryl and in emeralds in 1798. The metal was isolated in 1828by Wohler and by Bussy independently by the action of potassium on beryllium chloride.


Sources

Beryllium is found in some 30 mineral species, the most important of which arebertrandite, beryl, chrysoberyl, and phenacite. Aquamarine and emerald are precious formsof beryl. Beryl and bertrandite are the most important commercial sources of the elementand its compounds. Most of the metal is now prepared by reducing beryllium fluoride withmagnesium metal. Beryllium metal did not become readily available to industry until 1957.

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Science Quote

Michio Kaku Photo

'The strength and weakness of physicists is that we believe in what we can measure. And if we can't measure it, then we say it probably doesn't exist. And that closes us off to an enormous amount of phenomena that we may not be able to measure because they only happened once. For example, the Big Bang. ... That's one reason why they scoffed at higher dimensions for so many years. Now we realize that there's no alternative... '

Michio Kaku
(1947-)


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