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Physics and Astronomy Departments in Japan

  
JapanJapan
28 Departments
Listed

 
 University/College Department  Location
1.    Aoyama Gakuin University   Physics   Satagayaku Tokyo  
2.    Chiba University   Physics   Chiba  
3.    Chuo University   Physics   Tokyo  
4.    Gakushuin University   Physics   Tokyo  
5.    Hiroschima University   Department of Physical Science   Higashi-Hiroshima  
6.    Hokkaido University   Division of Physics   Sapporo  
7.    Kanazawa University   Department of Computational Science   Kanazawa  
8.    Kobe University   Physics   Kobe  
9.    Konan University   Physics   Konan  
10.    Kyoto University   Physics   Kyoto  
11.    Kyushu University   Physics   Fukuoka-city  
12.    Meiji University   Physics   Kanagawa  
13.    Nagoya University   Department of Physics and Astrophysics   Nagoya  
14.    Nihon University   Physics   Fukushima  
15.    Okayama University   Physics   Okayama  
16.    Osaca City University   Physics   Osaka  
17.    Osaka University   Research Center for Nuclear Physics   Osaka  
18.    Rikkyo University   Physics   Rikkyo  
19.    Saitama University   Physics   Saitama  
20.    Seikei University   Department of Applied Physics   Musasino-shi Tokyo  
21.    Shizuoka University   Physics   Shizuoka  
22.    Tohoku University   Physics   Sendai  
23.    Tokushima University   Physics   Tokushima  
24.    Tokyo Institute of Technology   Physics   Tokyo  
25.    Tokyo Metropolitan University   Physics   Tokyo  
26.    University of Tokyo   Institute of Physics   Komaba  
27.    University of Tsukuba   Department of Applied Physics   Ibaraki  
28.    Waseda University   Department of Applied Physics   Tokyo  








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'The strength and weakness of physicists is that we believe in what we can measure. And if we can't measure it, then we say it probably doesn't exist. And that closes us off to an enormous amount of phenomena that we may not be able to measure because they only happened once. For example, the Big Bang. ... That's one reason why they scoffed at higher dimensions for so many years. Now we realize that there's no alternative... '

Michio Kaku
(1947-)





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