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<p>ORNL researchers discovered that water in beryl displays some unique and unexpected characteristics. (Photo by Jeff Scovil)</p>
New state of water molecule discovered
Researchers have discovered a new state of water molecule using neutron scattering & computational modeling.
<p>A schematic of the CSU team’s device that demonstrates using light to create a spin current. A spin voltage drives spin-up and spin-down electrons to move in opposite directions, resulting in a pure spin current across a platinum layer.</p>
A brand-new way to produce electron spin currents
For the first time, scientists have used non-polarized light to produce what’s called a spin voltage – a unit of power produced from the quantum spinning of an individual electron.

<p>Beagle-2 landing site (credit: Yu Tao and Jan-Peter Muller, UCL)</p>
Mars surface revealed in unprecedented detail
The surface of Mars – including the location of Beagle-2 – has been shown in unprecedented detail by scientists using a revolutionary image stacking and matching technique.
3-D artistic depiction of multiple Quantum Cascade Lasers integrated above silicon waveguides. Credit: Alexander Spott
Team builds first quantum cascade laser on silicon
The advance may have applications that span from chemical bond spectroscopy and gas sensing, to astronomy and free-space communications.


A New Way To Get Electricity From Magnetism
By showing that a phenomenon dubbed the “inverse spin Hall effect” works in several organic semiconductors – including carbon-60 buckyballs - physicists changed magnetic “spin current” into electric current.
New state of matter detected in a 2D material
Researchers have observed the ‘fingerprint’ of a mysterious new quantum state of matter in a two-dimensional material, in which electrons break apart.
Robotic Fingers with a Gentle Touch
EPFL Scientists have developed a new soft robotic gripper -- made out of rubber and stretchable electrodes -- that can bend and pick up delicate objects like eggs and paper, taking robotics to a whole new level.

Science Facts

What Is An Atom?

by EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and ScienceIQ.com

: Image Courtesy EPA Atoms are the extremely small particles of which we, and everything around us, are made. A single element, such as oxygen, is made up of similar atoms. Different elements, such as oxygen, carbon, and uranium contain different kinds of atoms. There are 92 naturally occurring elements and scientists have made another 17, bringing the total to 109. Atoms are the smallest unit of an element that chemically behaves the same way the element does. When two chemicals react with each other, the reaction takes place between individual atoms--at the atomic level. The processes that cause materials be radioactive--to emit particles and energy--also occur at the atomic level.

In the early 20th century, an English scientist, Ernest Rutherford, and a Danish scientist, Niels Bohr, developed a way of thinking about the structure of an atom that described an atom as looking very much like our solar system. At the center of every atom was a nucleus, which is comparable to the sun in our solar system. Electrons moved around the nucleus in 'orbits' similar to the way planets move around the sun. (While scientists now know that atomic structure is more complex, the Rutherford-Bohr model is still a useful approximation to begin understanding about atomic structure.)

Opposite electrical charges of the protons and electrons do the work of holding the nucleus and its electrons together. Electrons closer to the nucleus are bound more tightly than the outer electrons because of their distance from the protons in the nucleus. The electrons in the outer orbits, or shells, are more loosely bound and affect an atom's chemical properties. A delicate balance of forces among nuclear particles keeps the nucleus stable. Any change in the number, the arrangement, or energy of the nucleons can upset this balance and cause the nucleus to become unstable or radioactive. (Disruption of electrons in the inner orbits can also cause an atom to emit radiation.) The amount of energy required to break up the nucleus into its parts is called the binding energy; it is often referred to as 'cosmic glue'. This is the same amount of energy given off when the nucleus formed.



Kinetic Theory of Gases

Air is a gas, and gases can be studied by considering the small scale action of individual molecules or by considering the large scale action of the gas as a whole. We can directly measure, or sense, ...
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AM Wave Deflection
Coming In Strong On Your AM Dial

The AM radio dial would be nothing but chaos and noise without a very basic rule - turn down the power at night. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) controls and regulates the airwaves in the ...
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The white lines represent the solar wind; the purple line is the bow shock produced by the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth
X-ray Emissions From Comets

The X-ray emission from comets is produced by high-energy particles, but the high-energy particles come not from the comet but from the sun. Matter is continually evaporating from the solar corona in ...
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Science Quote

'The strength and weakness of physicists is that we believe in what we can measure. And if we can't measure it, then we say it probably doesn't exist. And that closes us off to an enormous amount of phenomena that we may not be able to measure because they only happened once. For example, the Big Bang. ... That's one reason why they scoffed at higher dimensions for so many years. Now we realize that there's no alternative... '

Michio Kaku
(1947-)


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