Physics & Astronomy News

	Takaaki Kajita<br />
	Super-Kamiokande Collaboration<br />
	University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Japan</p>
	Arthur B. McDonald<br />
	Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Collaboration<br />
	Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada</p>
The Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 Awarded
The Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 was awarded jointly to Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald
	Covering all the angles</p>
	<br />
	Terahertz waves leak out of a small slit in the antenna at different angles, depending on frequency. The receiver can be tuned to select one angle, plucking a single data channel from a stream containing many channels.</p>
	<br />
	Mittleman lab/Brown University<br />
Researchers develop key component for terahertz wireless
Researchers from Brown University have developed what they believe to be the first system for multiplexing terahertz waves.

	Still image from animation of Philae separating from Rosetta and descending to the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November 2014.</p>
	Copyright ESA/ATG medialab</p>
Philae Probe Lands on the Rosetta Comet
ESA’s Rosetta mission has soft-landed its Philae probe on a comet, the first time in history that such an extraordinary feat has been achieved.
	Schematic of the new electricity generation technique. Bodies 1 and 2 have different work functions.<br />
	Credit: VTT</p>
New Technique for Generating Electricity Demonstrated
Scientists have demonstrated a new technique for generating electrical energy from mechanical vibrations.

Astronomers Solve Puzzle About Bizarre Object at the Center of our Galaxy
Latest research suggests enormous black hole drove two binary stars to merge into one.
Existence of Interacting Parallel Worlds Proposed
Many Interacting Worlds theory challenges foundations of quantum science
Universe May Face a darker future
New research offers a novel insight into the nature of dark matter and dark energy and what the future of our Universe might be.

Science Facts

From Here To There

by Gene Mascoli and

Image of the spiral galaxy NGC 4414: Image Courtesy NSSDC Photo Gallery We all know that our galaxy, the Milky Way, is big -- very big. So big in fact that its size is impossible to grasp. To cope with the astronomical distances of galaxies, since miles or kilometers won't do, scientists have had to resort to using a really big yardstick. That yardstick is the distance light travels in one year, what scientists call a 'light year.' A light year is an obvious choice. It makes use of a concept that we are all familiar with, a year, the time it takes Earth to travel around our Sun. It also makes use of something that eats up a lot of miles, the distance light, traveling at 186,000 miles per second, covers in one year, 5 trillion, 880 billion miles or, approximately 6 million million miles.

Now for some of you, the concept of a light year is familiar. But that's the point. It sounds familiar and tame to say that Alpha-Centauri, our nearest star, is 4.3 light years away. But if we add the zeros, we truly see how isolated we are, circling our Sun in our corner of the Milky Way. Alpha-Centauri is 25,000,000,000,000 miles from Earth.

Now consider that the most distant objects that we can see without a telescope are about 1.75 million light years away. There we go again -- big numbers. But that's a big number of something that already is a gigantic number. And that doesn't even take into consideration what the Hubble Space Telescope can see, distances of over 7 billion light years away. We are just now seeing light that left those distance realms in the early days of the universe. The universe is indeed a very, very big place.

Comet Borrelly as Seen By Deep Space 1
Stars With Long Hair

Throughout history, people have been both awed and alarmed by comets, stars with 'long hair' that appeared in the sky unannounced and unpredictably. We now know that comets are dirty-ice leftovers fro ...
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Nuclides & Isotopes

An atom that has an unbalanced ratio of neutrons to protons in the nucleus seeks to become more stable. The unbalanced or unstable atom tries to become more stable by changing the number of neutrons a ...
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Among the biggest challenges for GP-B is keeping its Science Instrument Assembly constantly cooled to a temperature of 1.8 Kelvin, or minus 271.4 degrees Celsius (slightly above absolute zero), which will last 18 to 24 months.
GP-B: More Than Just a Pretty Face

Questions about the ways space, time, light and gravity relate to each other have been asked for eons. Theories have been offered, yet many puzzles remain to be solved. No spacecraft ever built has re ...
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