PhysLink.com Logo

Question

Why are there no tides in rivers and lakes?
Asked by: John W.

Answer

Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon and, to a lesser extent, the sun on bodies of water. The earth's water bulges/moves toward and away from the moon(/sun), while it becomes shallower in areas perpendicular to the pull. Thus, there are two complete tide cycles per day.

Tides occur mainly in oceans because that is basically one huge body of water that is free to move all over the earth. Lakes and rivers do not cover enough area to have their water be moved significantly by gravity, or in other words, to have tides.
Answered by: Justin Clifford, High School Student, Alpine, Utah






Support US

Our server costs have gone up and our advertising revenue has gone down. You do the math! If you find our site useful, consider donating to keep us going. Thanks!


Science Quote

'Our loyalties are to the species and the planet. We speak for Earth. Our obligation to survive is owed not just to ourselves but also to that Cosmos, ancient and vast, from which we spring.'

Carl Sagan
(1934-1996)





All rights reserved. © Copyright '1995-'2018 PhysLink.com   Privacy Statement | Cookie Policy