Question

Why does the Fahrenheit scale use 32 degrees as a freezing point?

Asked by: Maria Ciaramitaro

Answer

Daniel Fahrenheit did not use the freezing point of water as a basis for developing his scale. He called the temperature of an ice/salt/water mixture 'zero degrees', as this was the lowest temperature he could conveniently attain in his lab. He called his own body temperature '96 degrees', and then divided the scale into single degrees between 0 and 96. On this scale, the freezing point of pure water happens to occur at 32 (and the boiling point at 212). The Celsius scale has more convenient values for these phase transition points (0 and 100 degrees) because Anders Celsius DID use water as a basis for his scale.

Answered by: Jonathan Heath

Search

Loading






Science Quote

'If I have seen a little further it is by standing on the shoulders of Giants.'

Isaac Newton
(1643-1727)
Science Sidebar | Science Education Articles
10 Ways to Keep Your Kids Interested In Science

Young children are natural scientists: they ask questions, pick up sticks and bugs outside, and are curious about the world around them. But as they get a bit older, many kids gradually lose their interest in science. They might see it as just another task at school, something that doesn't apply to their lives. Of course nothing could be further from the truth, so here are ten ways you can remind your kids that science is everywhere. Most of these are fun for adults, too! Continue reading ...

Top Selling

Here are our physics & astronomy bestsellers:
Magnetic Levitator - Classic
12 inch Galileo Thermometer
Cricket, Locust, Beetle and Crab
Solar Radiometer
Weather Station 4M Kit
3D Magnetic Field Tube
Clean Water Science 4M Kit
Revolving Multi-Color Fiberoptic Light
Periodic Table of Elements Poster - Laminated
Solar Science 4M Kit

Sponsors

USC University of Southern California Dornsife College Physics and Astronomy Department McMaster University Physics and Astronomy Department